#Review & #Interview: The Last Great Adventure of the PB&J Society by Janet Sumner Johnson

Posted January 19, 2017 by BAMF in Features, Interviews, Reviews // 2 Comments

bamfs-aloud-recap#Review & #Interview: The Last Great Adventure of the PB&J Society by Janet Sumner JohnsonThe Last Great Adventure of the PB&J Society by Janet Sumner Johnson
Published by Capstone Young Readers on April 2016
Genres: Middle Grade, Contemporary
Pages: 256
AmazonChaptersTBD

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Some things are better together. Like peanut butter and jelly. Or Annie and Jason. So when her best friend's house is threatened with foreclosure, Annie Jenkins is bursting with ideas to save Jason's home. She could sell her appendix on eBay. (Why not?) Win the lottery. (It's worth a shot!). Face the evil bankers herself. (She's one tough cookie, after all.) Or hunt down an elusive (and questionably real) pirate treasure. Whatever the plan, it has to work, or this is undoubtedly THE LAST GREAT ADVENTURE OF THE PB&J SOCIETY.


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BAMF Breakdown
Dani
Jamie
Overall:
Dani’s Review

I almost started my review the same was Jamie did, then saw her opening and changed my mind. We’re clearly merging minds.

Anyway, I did like this book. I’m a whopping 15 years older than Annie and Jason, but I was still able to very much relate with both of them. I thought they were incredibly well-written for 10 year olds, as I got a sense of their youthfulness and energy, along with the beginnings of pubescent awkwardness. Annie was so optimistic and naïve, constantly having ideas and insisting that things were done a certain way, so I can completely see why Jamie thinks I’m the Annie of the two of us. I am. That being said, when in my techie role, I’m also a lot like Jason, the grounded one when talking with more businessy types, telling them what is and isn’t possible. (I don’t like BS.)

The friendship in this was so sweet and fun. They had special ceremonies and everything! I’m totes jealous of the fact that Annie and Jason have been friends since birth, since I’ve never had that. The closest I have is my super close relationship with my younger brother. (Can I just say that Annie and Jason… and then me and my brother are Dani and Jason. Cool, eh? And my brother is very level-headed…) While I didn’t live in one place long enough as a kid to form the kind of friendship that Annie and Jason have, I can relate to having friends move away, that counting down of days and sometimes unexpected nature of it. (Hell, my parents pulled one over on me, telling me a month before they left the UK that they were going back to South Africa.) I felt Annie’s panic when she learned that Jason could leave her; how would she fill that gap in her life?

Overall, I don’t read a lot of Middle Grade, but this was definitely worth the detour from my usual. It was realistic and adorable and rather funny at times. Do beware, though, that it’ll make you hungry! Nom nom nom peanut butter and raspberry jam…

Jamie’s Review

I really enjoyed this one. It was a cute, contemporary middle grade novel that really showed how change can be both positive and negative and what it means to take the good with the bad. I think this will teach kids how to have empathy for others, be more of themselves, and to never stop imagining.

I loved both our main characters, Annie and Jason. I thought their friendship was really sweet and genuine — both of them were very supportive of the other without taking away from their own selves or narrative. I really liked how much they valued having one another in their lives and the way they expressed their friendship. I thought they had the right amount of give and take and were just great together as friends.

I was really pleased with the ending too because it shows you that change happens and that is okay because you move forward and still prosper. I thought this was a really cute story and now I definitely want to eat a PB&J sandwich!

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